HACKER MANIFESTO WARK PDF

Other Private information is practically the source of every large modern fortune. The text of A Hacker Manifesto begins with the sentence, "A double spooks the world, the double of abstraction. For Wark, the term "information economy" is an oxymoron. Economics is built on the idea of scarcity; it seeks to understand how human beings allocate limited resources to satisfy unlimited demands. Their primary tool for maintaining control is intellectual property, the legal apparatus of copyrights, trademarks and patents used to separate the producer class from the fruits of their labor. The producers are hackers, who Wark defines as artists, scientists, philosophers, musicians, etc.

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Other Private information is practically the source of every large modern fortune. The text of A Hacker Manifesto begins with the sentence, "A double spooks the world, the double of abstraction. For Wark, the term "information economy" is an oxymoron. Economics is built on the idea of scarcity; it seeks to understand how human beings allocate limited resources to satisfy unlimited demands. Their primary tool for maintaining control is intellectual property, the legal apparatus of copyrights, trademarks and patents used to separate the producer class from the fruits of their labor.

The producers are hackers, who Wark defines as artists, scientists, philosophers, musicians, etc. Hacking therefore begins with abstraction, the construction of previously unrealized relationships and distinctions between thoughts and things. Among the most far-reaching hacks, in fact of world-historical importance, is the creation of private property, the abstracting of physical space that transforms the natural landscape into real estate.

In fact, the legal description of a piece of real property is called an "abstract. The latest hack is the abstraction of labor power into information, tapping into not only the physical output of producers but also their very consciousness. Each of these hacks sets up new relationships of power: The property hack divides society into feudal lord what Wark terms the "pastoralist" and farmer; the wage hack creates capitalist and worker; information sets up the dialectic of vectoralist and hacker.

And in the footnotes a separate section at the end titled "Writings" , Wark carries on a polemic with the two theorists as he does with many of his other sources. Unfortunately, the fate of these world-historical hacks thus far is the commodization of their core idea, the transformation of creative expression into representations, i. The commodity is anonymous, exchange governed by cold-blooded rationality. The gift on the other hand is personal, creating relationships of obligation and reciprocity.

Anthropologists find gift economies only in cultures of material abundance. But ruling elites have sought to monopolize access to information from the beginning of recorded time.

Harold Innis and his student Marshall McLuhan describe how throughout history royals, priests and bureaucrats successively used carved stone, incised clay tablets, handwritten papyrus, parchment and paper, and print and electronic media as methods of control through communication. Typeset printing was crucial in the rise of the European nation-state starting in the 15th century. And the same literacy that allows workers to read Holy Scripture also makes it possible for them to read theCommunist Manifesto.

It consists of word collages, puns, mashups and rewritings of numerous previously published texts. Wark declares his text to be in the "crypto-Marxist" tradition, which includes Walter Benjamin, Debord, Deleuze and Guattari and a host of other visionary theorists.

It takes Marx as "source-code," something to be hacked and made more efficient. In true hacker style, the text of A Hacker Manifesto has been revised and re-written time and again, having appeared in different forms on various listservs and webzines over the years. This iteration is organized alphabetically by keyword and its prose is tuned tight as a drum.

A Hacker Manifesto has its shortcomings. Some of the word play is just a little too twee for example, "not the workers of the world united but the workings of the world untied". And the term vectoralist, besides being opaque and unwieldy, implies a distinction between the new ruling order and the bourgeois class of traditional Marxist analysis that may be not only unwarranted, but perhaps even counterproductive.

Naming hackers the new revolutionary class also seems overstated. By mashing up Romantic idealism with historical materialism and looping in some samples of cyberpunk futurism to boot, Wark offers a glimpse of potential new worlds. From Your Site Articles.

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There is a double spooking the world, the double of abstraction. The fortunes of states and armies, companies and communities depend on it. All contending classes - the landlords and farmers, the workers and capitalists - revere yet fear the relentless abstraction of the world on which their fortunes yet depend. All the classes but one. The hacker class. Whatever code we hack, be it programming language, poetic language, math or music, curves or colourings, we create the possibility of new things entering the world.

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McKenzie Wark's 'A Hacker Manifesto' Is in Its Own Sense, an Exemplary Hack

When McKenzie was 6 years old, her mother died. Wark is married to Christen Clifford. The couple have two children. Examples given in the book include the stock market crash of , the Tiananmen square demonstrations of and the fall of the Berlin Wall in

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A Hacker Manifesto

Table of Contents A double is haunting the world—the double of abstraction, the virtual reality of information, programming or poetry, math or music, curves or colorings upon which the fortunes of states and armies, companies and communities now depend. The bold aim of this book is to make manifest the origins, purpose, and interests of the emerging class responsible for making this new world—for producing the new concepts, new perceptions, and new sensations out of the stuff of raw data. A Hacker Manifesto deftly defines the fraught territory between the ever more strident demands by drug and media companies for protection of their patents and copyrights and the pervasive popular culture of file sharing and pirating. Drawing in equal measure on Guy Debord and Gilles Deleuze, A Hacker Manifesto offers a systematic restatement of Marxist thought for the age of cyberspace and globalization.

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